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Rebuild, Retitle, Insure, Transfer a Salvage Car in WV [GUIDE]

West Virginia Rebuilt Title

How to Title a Reconstructed Vehicle

1.) A vehicle cannot be reconstructed if it has been defined or branded as junk or non-repairable. 2.) If you want to title an out-of-state salvage vehicle in West Virginia, you must first exchange the out-of-state vehicle title by completing a Salvage Certificate Application (DMV-SV-1). 3.) A vehicle with a salvage title cannot be registered on any public highway until it has been inspected and retitled as a reconstructed vehicle. 4.) A vehicle branded with a salvage title cannot be operated on a public highway unless a one-trip-permit is issued by the WV State Police for the purpose of driving it to the inspection. Note: A licensed WV Dealer may use their ‘Demonstration’ tag to transport a vehicle. 5.) Airbags on salvage vehicles must be intact or replaced to manufacturers specifications to be eligible for a reconstructed Certificate of Title. 6.) Make copies of all salvage and reconstructed vehicle records, receipts, and photos and retain them for at least three years. 7.) For any questions concerning the completion of a salvage title or any other related documents, please contact the Salvage Unit at (304) 926-3971.

APPLYING FOR A SALVAGE CERTIFICATE OF TITLE If you already have a WV salvage Certificate of Title you may proceed to the next section: Applying for a Reconstructed Certificate of Title. You must apply for a WV salvage Certificate of Title, before you begin the process of reconstructing a salvage vehicle. APPLYING FOR A RECONSTRUCTED CERTIFICATE OF TITLE Once you’ve obtained a WV salvage Certificate of Title, you may begin the vehicle reconstruction process. Make copies of all salvage titles and related applications as outlined above, then submit them to DMV. Do not submit a Bill of Sale with a salvage title application. The owner(s) of a vehicle with a WV salvage Certificate of Title are responsible for making sure the proper section (Assignment or Reassignment by Dealer Only) is properly completed and signed by the seller. If your request is approved by DMV you will receive a WV salvage Certificate of Title and can proceed with reconstructing the vehicle. Take “before” photographs of the vehicle from the front, rear, and both sides. Retain the photos with all other reconstruction records for at least three years. As you are reconstructing the vehicle, keep all related receipts for parts, equipment, materials, and labor expenses. These must be made available to the DMV reconstructed vehicle inspector in step four. If major component parts from another vehicle are used, the VIN of that vehicle must be provided. Major components include: front clip assembly related parts; fenders; grill; hood; bumper; engine; transmission; rear clip assembly related parts; quarter panels; floor panels; and two or more doors. After reconstructing the vehicle, it must pass the state safety inspection. You may haul the vehicle to any official inspection station licensed by the WV State Police, or obtain a one-trip-permit from the WV State Police if you wish to drive the vehicle to the state safety inspection. If passed, the inspector will issue the inspection decal (good for 12 months) and complete and certify the Certificate of Inspection (DMV-202-TR). Next, the vehicle must be examined by a WV DMV reconstructed vehicle inspector. A.) You may wish to call ahead to ensure the reconstructed vehicle inspection station you plan to visit is open. The inspection schedule on the reverse side of this brochure will give you locations, as well as dates and times that inspections typically take place. 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 To apply for a WV salvage Certificate of Title, you will need to gather the items below: A.) The vehicle’s title/Certificate of Title with all required information completed, assigned to, or in the name of, the person(s) submitting the title B.) A properly completed Salvage Certificate Application (DMV-SV-1) C.) The Odometer disclosure information recorded on the back of the Certificate of Title or an Odometer Certification (DMV-TM-1) for nonconforming titles (Vehicles over ten years old are exempt from this requirement) D.) A $22.50 fee to process the application B.) Vehicles with salvage titles may only be driven to an inspection station if a one-trip-permit has been obtained from the WV State Police. Otherwise, the reconstructed vehicle must be towed or hauled to the reconstructed vehicle inspection. C.) Present the inspector with all “before” photographs taken of the vehicle and the WV salvage Certificate of Title. Once a rebuilt vehicle and all pertinent records have been approved by the WV DMV reconstructed vehicle inspector, the owner(s) must apply for a reconstructed Certificate of Title. To obtain a reconstructed Certificate of Title, you must submit the following to DMV: A.) A properly assigned WV salvage Certificate of Title with the odometer disclosure completed B.) The original Reconstructed Vehicle Examination (DMV-SV-3), completed by the owner(s) and signed by the DMV reconstructed vehicle inspector C.) The Certificate of Inspection (DMV-202-TR) by the inspector D.) A $35.00 inspection fee, plus any other applicable fees.

1. West Virginia Title Application and WV DMV Forms: Car Rebuilding Rules

In West Virginia WV, vehicles that have suffered damage that have made them a total loss according to the insurance company will be deemed salvage vehicles by the state. However, it is often possible to rebuild these motor vehicles, receive reconstructed title and to get them back on the road. First, you need to make sure the vehicle has a salvage title.

Applying for a Salvage Certificate of Title
Before you can begin the process of rebuilding the vehicle, you need to apply some WV DMV forms for the WB salvage certificate of title by providing the vehicle’s current title, and a completed West Virginia Salvage Title Certificate Application (DMV-SV-1). Also, complete the odometer disclosure information on the back of the title, or on an Odometer Certification form (DMV-TM-1) if it is a non conforming title.

Any vehicle over ten years old is exempt from the odometer requirement. The current fee for processing the application is $15. If they approve the request, you will receive your salvage certificate of title, and then you can start to reconstruct the vehicle.

Applying for a Reconstructed Certificate of Title
A vehicle cannot be reconstructed or renew if it has been branded as junk or non-repairable. The only time that you can drive a vehicle that has a salvage title, even after repaired, to the inspection is using a one-time permit. The airbags on the vehicle need to be intact or replaced to the manufacturer’s specifications.

You will need to take before photographs of the vehicle from the front, rear, and both sides. Keep the photos, along with all of your other documentation for at least three years. During the construction process, make sure you keep all of the receipts for the parts, labor and materials, as you will need to provide these to the DMV during the inspection phase.

If there are any other major components used in the repair that came out of another vehicle, you will need to include the VIN from the vehicle where they were taken. Major parts include the front clip assembly, grill, fenders, hood, engine, transmission, bumper, rear clip assembly, quarter panels, floor panels and two or more doors.

After the repairs are complete, the vehicle will need to go through the state safety inspection. When it passes, you will receive an inspection decal that is good for 12 months. The officer that does the inspection will complete and certify the Certificate of Inspection (DMV-202-TR) for you. This is only the first inspection though. You also need to have the vehicle inspected by a DMV reconstructed vehicle inspector.

This inspection will require you to schedule an exam at one of the offices listed below. The inspector will need to have all of the before photos you took of the vehicle, as well as the salvage certificate (not duplicate). They will make sure that all of the parts used in repairing the vehicle were obtained legally.

After you pass this inspection, you will need to submit the salvage certificate of title, along with the original Reconstructed Vehicle Examination form, and the $35 inspection fee to the DMV. Once driver take care of the paperwork, he will be able to receive your rebuilt title, and register the vehicle so you can drive it in West Virginia.

Inspection Schedule for Reconstructed Vehicles
There are a number of different locations available around the state for inspections. Days and times that are available are subject to change, so you will want to contact the office ahead of time to get the latest information.

2. Salvaged Vehicles in West Virginia

Do you have a salvaged car on your hands? Keep reading for details on what you must do to satisfy West Virginia law and how you can work with the Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to recuperate some of your loss.

What Is a Salvaged Car in WV?
In West Virginia, a salvaged car is:

One so damaged it would cost 75% or more of the vehicle’s fair market value to repair.
AND/OR
A flood-damaged vehicle that had water in the passenger area and/or trunk.
Typically, your auto insurance company will determine whether your car qualifies as a salvage, or, total loss.

Cosmetic Total Loss
A cosmetic total loss is similar to a regular total loss in that the cost to repair damages would approach or exceed the car’s actual cash value. However, to qualify, the damages must only be cosmetic—meaning the vehicle can continue operating safely and legally on state roads and highways (it just might not look too pretty passing by!).

To apply for a cosmetic total loss salvage title, submit the following to your local DMV office:

A completed Certificate of Cosmetic Total Loss (Form DMV-SV-5).
Your insurance provider will need to fill out a section of this form.
The original car title.
Payment for the $22.50 title fee.
Speak with your insurance agent for details on restrictions and requirements when it comes to having a cosmetic total loss salvage title.

WV Salvaged Settlements
Generally, when your car sustains serious damage, the first step is filing a total loss claim. Your insurance company has its own process, but typically—after inspecting the damage and declaring the car a total loss—your provider will offer you the following settlement options:

Full settlement.
You take complete payout and your insurance company keeps the car.
Other than providing proof of lien removal (if applicable), the total loss isn’t your responsibility anymore, and you can put the settlement money towards finding a replacement vehicle.
Partial settlement.
You take partial payment from your insurance provider and keep the car.
You must apply for a salvage title, after which you can:
Sell the car to a business that deals with scrapping cars (e.g. junkyard or car recycler).
OR
Repair the car, have it inspected, and apply for a reconstructed title so you can get it back on the road.
Consult with your insurance agent before making a final decision—they’ll have the best idea of how much time and money your totaled car requires to get up and running again.

Going forward, we’ll assume you accepted a partial settlement and kept the car for yourself.

Apply for a WV Salvaged Title
Applying for a salvage title in West Virginia is easy. Just provide the following items at your local DMV office:

A completed Salvage Certificate Application (Form DMV-SV-1).
The car title (assigned to you).
Record the odometer reading on the back of the title if your car is 10 years old or newer. You can record the mileage using an Odometer Certification (Form DMV-TM-1) if there isn’t space on the title.
The $22.50 salvage title fee.
Once you receive your West Virginia salvaged title, you can start reconstructing your car to its original glory. BEFORE starting repairs, take pictures of your car on all sides (front, rear, left, and right)—you’ll need to provide these photos at your reconstructed vehicle inspection.

If you have additional questions about applying for a salvaged title, call the WV Division of Motor Vehicles at (304) 558-3900.

WV Reconstructed Car Inspections
Once you’ve rebuilt the car, it must pass a safety inspection AND a reconstructed car inspection, in that order.

Safety Inspection
First, you must take your car to a safety inspection station licensed by the West Virginia State Police (WVSP). Many auto repair shops and similar businesses can perform safety inspections, but call ahead to make sure.

You can tow or haul the car, or you can obtain a single trip permit from the WV State Police to drive to the inspection site. If you’d like to request a one-trip permit, call your local WVSP Troop for assistance. Safety inspection fees can vary, but should cost no more than $14.66.

Once your car passes, the inspector will affix a sticker to the windshield that’s valid for 12 months and complete a Certificate of Inspection (Form DMV-202-TR) for you—keep this certificate safe! If it’s lost, stolen, or damaged, you’ll need to have your car re-inspected.

Rebuilt Inspection
After the safety inspection, your car will need to pass a reconstructed vehicle inspection. The West Virginia DMV provides a list of DMV offices that perform reconstructed vehicle inspections and their respective dates and times of availability. Always call ahead to confirm the office will be open and ready for an inspection.

You can tow or haul your car to the inspection site or request a single trip permit—call your local WVSP Troop for instructions.

When it’s time for your reconstructed vehicle inspection, bring:

Your reconstructed car.
The salvaged title.
Photos of the car BEFORE repairs.
Bills of sale, receipts, and/or invoices for all parts and labor needed to rebuild the car.
In addition, provide the vehicle identification number (VIN) for any replacement major component parts taken from other cars—see the DMV’s brochure on salvaged/reconstructed vehicles for qualifying major component parts.
Proof your car passed the safety inspection.
Your car will have the safety inspection decal BUT it’s a good idea to bring the completed Certificate of Inspection (Form DMV-202-TR) too.
Once your vehicle passes, the inspector will complete and give you a Reconstructed Vehicle Examination (Form DMV-SV-3). You’re only one step away from obtaining a reconstructed vehicle title!

Rebuilt Titles in West Virginia
Conveniently, you can apply for a rebuilt WV title at the same DMV office that performed your reconstructed vehicle check. right after the inspection’s complete.

Submit the following to the DMV:

The salvage title.
The original Reconstructed Vehicle Examination (Form DMV-SV-3), completed and signed by the reconstructed vehicle inspector.
A completed Application for Certificate of Title (Form DMV-1-TR) with the “RECONSTRUCTED” brand box marked.
IF you’re registering the car at the same time:
Proof of WV auto insurance.
Copies of the front and back of your old registration card (if the car is still registered) and you’re transferring the license plate.
Payment for the applicable fees:
Inspection fee: $35.
Titling fees: Refer to the fees chart on your title application for specifics.
Registration fees: See the DMV’s registration fees brochure.
Once all your paperwork’s been processed and confirmed to be correct, you’ll receive your West Virginia reconstructed vehicle title! Now you can take your previously salvaged car on the road again.

If you need help putting together your application for a reconstructed title, give the WV Division of Motor Vehicles a call at (304) 558-3900.

3. Can you insure a car with a salvage title in West Virginia?

No, you cannot insure a car with a salvage title in West Virginia. Salvage vehicles are cars that have been declared a total loss, meaning they’re too damaged to be worth repairing and cannot be driven legally. As a result, no legitimate car insurance company writes policies for them.

Although insurance companies in West Virginia won’t insure a car with a current salvage title, you can get coverage if you have the vehicle repaired and inspected by a state-certified mechanic. If it’s declared safe to drive, the DMV will issue the car a reconstructed title. Several insurance companies, including Allstate and Geico, sell policies to vehicles with a reconstructed title.

Keep in mind that some insurers will only sell liability insurance for reconstructed cars, meaning that they won’t pay for any physical damage to the vehicle. Even if you are able to get collision and comprehensive insurance, your policy may not cover the full value of the car if it’s totaled again.

How to Apply for a Salvage Title in West Virginia
Vehicle owners can apply for a salvage title in West Virginia by submitting the proper application form to the state Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV). However, in order to obtain a car salvage certificate, applicants and their motor vehicles must meet certain requirements. In general, either the original owner of a vehicle or its insurance company can apply for a certificate of salvage, depending on who has kept possession of the car.

After obtaining a WV salvage certificate, car owners will be allowed to repair their vehicles and apply for a “reconstructed” certificate of title. However, note that the option to obtain a rebuilt title is only extended to vehicles that were not branded as junk or “non-repairable.” In any case, restored cars will have to pass both a state safety inspection and a reconstructed vehicle inspection in order to prove their roadworthiness and be retitled in the state. To learn more about West Virginia salvage title cars and the procedures related to obtaining these credentials, read the sections below.

What is a West Virginia salvage title?
Before applying for a West Virginia salvage car title, you are encouraged to learn more about this particular type of certificate. In general, a vehicle salvage title is a document issued to damaged cars that can no longer be operated safely or legally on state roads. Therefore, if your vehicle sustains heavy damages, you are required to surrender your current title certificate and car registration card. However, if the car damages are simply cosmetic, you will not be able to obtain a total loss certificate and your car will not be classified as salvage.

In addition to the WV car salvage title, the state DMV issues other similar certificates, which will vary depending on the type and degree of the damages sustained by a vehicle. For instance, while salvage certificates are issued to vehicles that can still be repaired, cars with extreme damages can only receive a “non-repairable” certificate. In such cases, these vehicles will never receive a new title or registration again, and can only be used for the sale of scrap or spare parts.

West Virginia Salvage Title Eligibility Requirements
You can only successfully obtain a DMV salvage title in West Virginia if you own a motor vehicle that meets the state’s salvage classification. According to current laws, cars will qualify for salvage titles under the following circumstances:

The vehicle has been paid off as a total loss by an auto insurance company. This may have been the result of the car having sustained damages that exceed 74 percent of its actual market value. Otherwise, it was because the vehicle was damaged by floor or fire.
The salvage title car is not considered a total loss. Thus, it is repairable.
The vehicle was transferred to West Virginia on an out-of-state title with a similar salvage brand.
If your motor vehicle is not eligible for a WV car salvage certificate, it must still be titled with a different type of certificate, such as a “non-repairable” or a “cosmetic total loss” title.

4. How to Get a Salvage Title in West Virginia

If you would like to learn how to get a salvage title in West Virginia, note that you will have to submit several types of documents and pay for the applicable fees at a nearby DMV office. The application process will vary to a certain degree depending on whether you are applying as the original owner, an insurance agent or a legal entity that has obtained the salvage vehicle. The standard steps in the salvage title application process are outlined below:

Get the existing certificate of title properly reassigned.
Fill out the Salvage Certification Application (Form DMV-SV-1). If applying as an original owner who has retained the vehicle, complete the Salvage Certificate/Owner Retention (Form DMV-SV-6) document.
Complete an Odometer Certification (Form DMV-TM-1) if your vehicle is newer than 11 model years.
Provide your lienholder’s information, if applicable.
Arrange payment for the applicable fees.
After submitting a successful DMV salvage title application in WV, car owners will receive the requested title at their recorded address, provided that the division approves their submission. It is important to note that insurance companies applying for this type of title will have to submit their requests within 10 days of the date of a total loss settlement, and may have to provide additional forms during the application process.

Salvage Car Inspections in West Virginia
The state DMV will not require a salvage vehicle inspection in West Virginia when issuing salvage certificates. On the other hand, if you repair a wrecked vehicle and choose to apply for a rebuilt salvage title, you will have to submit your car to two different types of inspections. The purpose of this two-phase inspection process is to verify that the motor vehicle meets the state safety standards and that it was not restored with stolen parts.

The first step toward obtaining a restored salvage title in WV is rebuilding the vehicle and keeping receipts for the parts and expenses used to restore it. Moreover, be mindful that you must take pictures of the car prior to any repairs. Then, you must schedule a visit to a police inspection station in order to obtain the standard safety Certificate of Inspection (Form DMV-202-TR).

The next step is submitting your motor vehicle to a reconstructed vehicle examination at a nearby DMV site. To pass this salvage car inspection, you will be asked to submit the following items:

Your car salvage certificate
Photographs of the wrecked vehicle
Receipts and/or proofs of ownership for the parts used to rebuild the vehicle
Receipts for the labor expenses
Proof of the passed safety inspection
Once your motor vehicle passes the inspection procedure, you will receive the Reconstructed Vehicle Examination Form (DMV-SV-3), which is a document you will need to apply for a rebuilt title in West Virginia.

Note: If you are unable to haul the vehicle to the inspection sites, you can obtain a temporary driving permit from the WV State Police.

West Virginia Salvage Title Fees
The last step when getting a West Virginia salvage title or a reconstructed certificate is paying the applicable fees. Overall, the standard salvage title fee is set at $22.50, regardless of the type of total loss brand attached to the credential. On the other hand, if you are applying for a non-repairable certificate, you will not be required to pay any fees.

Furthermore, if you are getting a reconstructed title, you will first have to pay for the inspections fees. For instance, the DMV reconstructed vehicle examination currently costs $35. Once the motor vehicle passes inspection, you will have to arrange payment for the titling fee once again and the applicable registration costs, which vary based on several factors.

Note: If you are transferring an out-of-state salvage title in West Virginia, you will only have to pay a $10 fee.

Salvage Title Forms
Salvage Certificate Application (Form DMV-SV-1)
Salvage Certificate/Owner Retention (Form DMV-SV-6)
Certificate of Inspection (Form DMV-202-TR)
Note: DMV forms change regularly. The forms provided above are current based on the date of writing.

5. West Virginia State Title Processing Procedures

What form of title must an insurer obtain in connection with the sale of a vehicle that has been acquired through the settlement of a claim?

Pursuant to West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10:

(a) In the event a motor vehicle is determined to be a total loss or otherwise designated as “totaled” by any insurance company or insurer, and upon payment of an agreed price as a claim settlement to any insured or claimant owner for the purchase of the vehicle, the insurance company or the insurer shall receive the certificate of title and the vehicle except that an insured or claimant owner may choose to retain possession of a cosmetically damaged vehicle, as provided in subdivision (2) of this subsection. The term “total loss” means a motor vehicle which has sustained damages equivalent to seventy-five percent or more of the market value as determined by a nationally accepted used car value guide. The insurance company or insurer shall within ten days determine if the vehicle is repairable, cosmetically damaged or nonrepairable and surrender the certificate of title and a copy of the claim settlement to the division of motor vehicles. If the insurance company or insurer determines that the vehicle is repairable, the division shall issue a “salvage certificate”, on a form prescribed by the commissioner, in the name of the insurance company or the insurer. The certificate shall contain on the reverse thereof spaces for one successive assignment before a new certificate at an additional fee is required.

(1) Upon the sale of the vehicle the insurance company or insurer shall endorse the assignment of ownership on the salvage certificate and deliver it to the purchaser. The vehicle shall not be titled or registered for operation on the streets or highways of this state unless there is compliance with subsection (c) of this section. The division shall charge a fee of fifteen dollars for each salvage title issued.

(2) If the insurance company or insurer determines the damage to a totaled vehicle is exclusively cosmetic and no repair is necessary in order to legally and safely operate the motor vehicle on the roads and highways of this state, the insurance company or insurer shall upon payment of the claim settlement submit the certificate of title to the division.

(A) The division shall, without further inspection, issue a title branded “cosmetic total loss” to the insured or claimant owner if the insured or claimant owner wishes to retain possession of the vehicle, in lieu of a “salvage certificate.” A fee of five dollars shall be charged for each “cosmetic total loss” title issued. The terms “cosmetically damaged” and “cosmetic total loss” do not include any vehicle which has been damaged by flood or fire. The designation “cosmetic total loss” on a title cannot be changed.

(B) If the insured or claimant owner elects not to take possession of the vehicle and the insurance company or insurer retains possession, the division shall issue a cosmetic total loss salvage certificate to the insurance company or insurer. The division shall charge a fee of fifteen dollars for each cosmetic total loss salvage certificate issued. The division shall, upon surrender of the cosmetic total loss salvage certificate issued under the provisions of this paragraph, and payment of the five percent privilege tax on the fair market value of the vehicle as determined by the commissioner, issue a title branded “cosmetic total loss” without further inspection.

(3) If the insurance company or insurer determines that the damage to a totaled vehicle renders it nonrepairable, incapable of safe operation for use on roads and highways and which has no resale value except as a source of parts or scrap, the insurance company or vehicle owner shall request that the division issue a nonrepairable motor vehicle certificate in lieu of a salvage certificate. The division shall issue a nonrepairable motor vehicle certificate without charge.

(b) [intentionally omitted]

(c) [intentionally omitted]

(d) The owner or title holder of any motor vehicle titled in this state which has previously been branded in this state or another state as “salvage,” “reconstructed,” “cosmetic total loss,” “cosmetic total loss salvage,” “flood” or “fire” or an equivalent term under another state's laws shall, upon becoming aware of the brand, apply for and receive a title from the division of motor vehicles on which the brand “reconstructed,” “salvage,” “cosmetic total loss” “cosmetic total loss salvage,” “flood” or “fire” is shown. A fee of five dollars will be charged for each title so issued. (e) If application is made for title to a motor vehicle, the title to which has previously been branded “reconstructed,” “salvage,” “cosmetic total loss,” “cosmetic total loss salvage,” “flood” or “fire” by the division of motor vehicles under this section and said application is accompanied by a title from another state which does not carry the brand, the division shall, before issuing the title, affix the brand “reconstructed,” “cosmetic total loss,” “cosmetic total loss salvage,” “flood” or “fire” to the title. The privilege tax paid on a motor vehicle titled as “reconstructed” “cosmetic total loss,” “flood” or “fire” under the provisions of this section shall be based on fifty percent of the fair market value of the vehicle as determined by a nationally accepted used car value guide to be used by the commissioner.

(f) The division shall charge a fee of fifteen dollars for the issuance of each salvage certificate or cosmetic total loss salvage certificate but shall not require the payment of the five percent privilege tax. However, upon application for a certificate of title for a reconstructed, cosmetic total loss, flood or fire damaged vehicle, the division shall collect the five percent privilege tax on the fair market value of the vehicle as determined by the commissioner unless the applicant is otherwise exempt from the payment of such privilege tax. A wrecker/dismantler/rebuilder is exempt from the five percent privilege tax upon titling a reconstructed vehicle. [remainder intentionally omitted]

(g) A certificate of title issued by the division for a reconstructed vehicle shall contain markings in bold print on the face of the title that it is for a reconstructed, flood or fire damaged vehicle.

NOTE: Fee schedule has changed from above information. See local DMV for actual fees.
What documents must an insurer provide to Copart in order to sell a vehicle on a Salvage Certificate of Title?

The insurer shall provide Copart with a Certificate of Title or a comparable ownership document issued by another state or jurisdiction (either endorsed over to the insurer or accompanied by a power of attorney), an odometer disclosure statement, a release of any liens, and an ACV.

Copart will submit these documents along with a Salvage Certificate Application (SV-1) and the appropriate fee to the Division of Motor Vehicles for processing. [Note: Although West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a) requires that a copy of the claim settlement be sent to the Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Motor Vehicles does not enforce this rule.]

Thereafter, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall issue a Salvage Certificate of Title in the name of the insurer.

Copart, acting under a power of attorney for the insurer, will then sell the vehicle at auction and reassign the insurer’s Salvage Certificate of Title to the purchaser. [West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10]

What documents must an insurer provide to Copart in order to sell a vehicle on a Salvage Certificate of Title branded “Flood Damage”?

The insurer shall provide Copart with a Certificate of Title or a comparable ownership document issued by another state or jurisdiction (either endorsed over to the insurer or accompanied by a power of attorney), an odometer disclosure statement, a release of any liens, and an ACV.

Copart will submit these documents along with a Salvage Certificate Application (SV-1) and the appropriate fee to the Division of Motor Vehicles for processing. [Note: Although West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a) requires that a copy of the claim settlement be sent to the Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Motor Vehicles does not enforce this rule.]

Thereafter, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall issue a Salvage Certificate of Title branded “Flood Damage” in the name of the insurer.

Copart, acting under a power of attorney for the insurer, will then sell the vehicle at auction and reassign the insurer’s Salvage Certificate of Title branded “Flood Damage” to the purchaser.

[West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10]

What documents must an insurer provide to Copart in order to sell a vehicle on a Salvage Certificate of Title branded “Fire Damage”?

The insurer shall provide Copart with a Certificate of Title or a comparable ownership document issued by another state or jurisdiction (either endorsed over to the insurer or accompanied by a power of attorney), an odometer disclosure statement, a release of any liens, and an ACV.

Copart will submit these documents along with a Salvage Certificate Application (SV-1) and the appropriate fee to the Division of Motor Vehicles for processing. [Note: Although West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a) requires that a copy of the claim settlement be sent to the Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Motor Vehicles does not enforce this rule.]

Thereafter, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall issue a Salvage Certificate of Title branded “Fire Damage” in the name of the insurer.

Copart, acting under a power of attorney for the insurer, will then sell the vehicle at auction and reassign the insurer’s Salvage Certificate of Title branded “Fire Damage” to the purchaser.

[West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10]

What documents must an insurer provide to Copart in order to obtain a Cosmetic Total Loss Certificate of Title in the name of the insured (if the insured retains possession of the vehicle)?

The insurer shall provide Copart with a Certificate of Title or a comparable ownership document issued by another state or jurisdiction (either endorsed over to the insurer or accompanied by a power of attorney), an odometer disclosure statement, a release of any liens, and an ACV.

Copart will submit these documents along with a Cosmetic Total Loss Certificate of Title Application (SV-5) and the appropriate fee to the Division of Motor Vehicles for processing. [Note: Although West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a) requires that a copy of the claim settlement be sent to the Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Motor Vehicles does not enforce this rule.]

Thereafter, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall issue a Cosmetic Total Loss Certificate of Title in the name of the insured. This Cosmetic Total Loss Certificate of Title will be returned directly to the insured.

[West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a)]

What documents must an insurer provide to Copart in order to sell a vehicle on a Cosmetic Total Loss Salvage Certificate of Title (if insurance company keeps the vehicle)?

The insurer shall provide Copart with a Certificate of Title or a comparable ownership document issued by another state or jurisdiction (either endorsed over to the insurer or accompanied by a power of attorney), an odometer disclosure statement, a release of any liens, and an ACV.

Copart will submit these documents along with a Salvage Certificate Application requesting a Cosmetic Total Loss Salvage Certificate of Title (SV-1) and the appropriate fee to the Division of Motor Vehicles for processing. [Note: Although West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a) requires that a copy of the claim settlement be sent to the Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Motor Vehicles does not enforce this rule.]

Thereafter, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall issue a Cosmetic Total Loss Salvage Certificate of Title in the name of the insurer.

Copart, acting under a power of attorney for the insurer, will then sell the vehicle at auction and reassign the insurer’s Cosmetic Total Loss Salvage Certificate of Title to the purchaser.

[West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10]

What documents must an insurer provide to Copart in order to sell a vehicle on Nonrepairable Motor Vehicle Certificate?

The insurer shall provide Copart with a Certificate of Title or a comparable ownership document issued by another state or jurisdiction (either endorsed over to the insurer or accompanied by a power of attorney), an odometer disclosure statement, a release of any liens, and an ACV.

Copart will submit these documents along with a Salvage Certificate Application requesting a Nonrepairable Motor Vehicle Certificate (SV-1) and the appropriate fee to the Division of Motor Vehicles for processing. [Note: Although West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a) requires that a copy of the claim settlement be sent to the Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Motor Vehicles does not enforce this rule.]

Thereafter, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall issue a Nonrepairable Motor Vehicle Certificate in the name of the insurer.

Copart, acting under a power of attorney for the insurer, will then sell the vehicle at auction and reassign the insurer’s Nonrepairable Motor Vehicle Certificate to the purchaser.

[West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10]

What documents must an insurer provide to Copart in order to sell a recovered theft vehicle recovered substantially intact with no substantial damage, where title is still in the name of the insured?

When a vehicle has been stolen, the insurer shall provide Copart with a Certificate of Title or a comparable ownership document issued by another state or jurisdiction (either endorsed over to the insurer or accompanied by a power of attorney), an odometer disclosure statement, a release of any liens, and a police report.

After receipt of these documents, Copart will submit these documents along with a cover letter requesting a Certificate of Title in the insurance company’s name stamped “Unrecovered Theft” and the appropriate fee to the Division of Motor Vehicles for processing. [Note: Although West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10(a) requires that a copy of the claim settlement be sent to the Division of Motor Vehicles, the Division of Motor Vehicles does not enforce this rule.]

Thereafter, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall issue a Certificate of Title in the insurance company’s name stamped Unrecovered Theft. Upon receipt, Copart will forward the Certificate of Title to the insurer for safekeeping.

If the vehicle is recovered, the Certificate of Title and a notarized letter on insurance company letterhead requesting the appropriate title depending upon the damage along with an ACV will be returned to Copart by the insurer in order to obtain the appropriate title depending upon the damage to the vehicle.

Copart, acting upon a power of attorney for the insurer, will then sell the vehicle at auction and reassign the insurer’s appropriate Certificate of Title to the purchaser.

[West Virginia Code § 17A-4-10]

What legal duties are imposed upon a lienholder following satisfaction of the lien?

Pursuant to West Virginia Code § 17A-4A-7:

An owner upon securing the release of any lien or encumbrance upon a vehicle shown upon the certificate of title issued therefor may exhibit the document evidencing such release, signed by the person or persons making the release and acknowledged before a notary public or someone authorized by the laws of this state to take acknowledgments of deeds, and this document together with the certificate of title shall be returned to the division; or the lienholder may release the lien by endorsing across the lien in his or her favor on the face of the title or closely adjacent thereto the following words or words of similar effect or purport: “This lien, this day fully paid, satisfied and released, this ……. day of ……….,” and duly signing and executing said endorsement and acknowledging the same before a notary public and having the notary public execute a certificate of the acknowledgment in the form required for releasing deeds of trust in this state; or when it is impossible to secure either such release from the beneficiary or holder of the lien, the owner may exhibit to the division whatever evidence may be available showing that the debt secured has been satisfied, together with a statement by the owner under oath that the debt has been paid and the certificate of title to such vehicle. The division when satisfied as to the genuineness and regularity thereof shall issue to the owner either a new certificate of title in proper form or an endorsement or rider showing the release of the lien or encumbrance which the division shall attach to the outstanding certificate of title. For the purposes of this article, the term release shall mean either an electronic or paper transaction format.

Pursuant to West Virginia Code § 17A-4A-8:

It shall be unlawful and constitute a misdemeanor for a lienor who holds a certificate of title either electronically or in a paper format as provided in this article to refuse or fail to execute a release as provided for in the next preceding section, or to refuse or fail to surrender the certificate of title to the person legally entitled thereto within fifteen days after the lien shall have been paid and satisfied.

6. The Differences Between Salvage and Reconstructed Title

When a car becomes damaged to a point that the repair costs exceed a certain portion of the car’s value, the car is considered a “total loss.” The exact ratio of repair cost to vehicle value that is considered to be a total loss varies from state to state, but is generally at least 70%. When a vehicle is a total loss, the insurance company normally takes title to the vehicle and can sell it with a salvage title for a licensed body shop to rebuild.

In most states, a salvage title means that a vehicle is not roadworthy and cannot be registered to be driven on the highway. A rebuilt or reconstructed title vehicle, sometimes referred to as an “R” title, is one that has passed a state inspection to make sure the damage has been repaired to a point where it is safe to operate on the road. The rebuilt title inspection is not the same as an annual state safety inspection for a non-salvage title vehicle.

Buying a salvage or rebuilt title vehicle is extremely risky. Unless you are a licensed body repair technician, you should never knowingly purchase a salvage vehicle for anything but parts because it cannot in most cases be licensed or insured. A rebuilt title vehicle can normally be registered to drive, but it will be difficult to get insurance. Another issue with rebuilt title vehicles is safety. While the vehicle does have to pass an inspection to make sure that it has been repaired enough to be safe to drive, the state inspectors can only see limited parts of the vehicle. The state inspector can’t dismantle the vehicle to make sure the repairs were correctly done, so it is not difficult for an unscrupulous body shop to cover up a shoddy or non-existent repair so that the vehicle gets the reconstructed title but is still not safe. Also, even if vehicle damage is repaired to a point where it is safe to operate and given a rebuilt or reconstructed title, the vehicle can still have serious mechanical issues that do not surface until shortly after purchase that can far exceed the purchase price of the vehicle to repair.

In addition to the safety concerns, salvage and reconstructed vehicles are worth substantially less than non-branded title vehicles. If the title brand is not showing on the CarFax or AutoCheck or other vehicle history report at the time of purchase, the vehicle history will most likely be updated at some point with the title brand to alert potential buyers. Even if the vehicle history report is not showing the vehicle as reconstructed or salvage title, a seller who knows that the vehicle has such a title and sells the vehicle without disclosure is committing fraud.

Dealerships have ways to hide the fact that a vehicle was declared a total loss and was not issued a rebuilt title. Often this is done through buying and selling across state lines multiple times so that the title brand gets lost or “washed” by the time it is put on the lot. A dealership has an obligation to fully disclose a total loss designation or a salvage or rebuilt title. If you were sold a car and were not told that it was a total loss, or had a salvage or reconstructed title, contact Roseman Law Firm for a free consultation to review your case.

Are you planning to transfer a rebuilt title between West Virginia and its surrounding states? Check out my detailed guides for Pennsylvania, Virginia, Kentucky, Maryland and Ohio.

Knowledgebase

What is a rebuilt title (what does a rebuilt title mean)?

A rebuilt title is also called a reconstructed title. There are two types of rebuilt titles. A legal salvage title is usually issued because the vehicle has suffered severe damage and needs to be rebuilt. A legal salvage title is necessary to legally sell the vehicle. A non-legal salvage title is issued when the damage isn't severe enough to warrant a legal salvage title, but the owner determines that repairing the vehicle is too costly. A non-legal salvage title is often issued with a brand. The "brand" means the vehicle is only good for parts.

What is a salvage title (what does a rebuilt title mean)?

Salvage titles are assigned to vehicles that have been deemed unrepairable and uninsurable, usually because of the damage they have sustained. The title assigned to a salvage vehicle usually has a letter and an alphanumeric code. However, if a vehicle has been damaged and repaired and the damage has been deemed minor, the original title holder can request a replacement title without a salvage code!

A salvage title is what you get when you buy a car that has been involved in an accident. Salvage titles are fairly cheap to get and the car probably isn't in the best condition, but they could be good to get if you're on a budget. There are certain states that require you to get a vehicle inspected after it has been repaired. For the most part, the car will make it through this inspection because most people don't know how to spot the damage done to it after an accident.

After a vehicle sold at auction, a dealership may not have the time to inspect every vehicle properly. They will sell the vehicles as is, even if there is a salvage title. That is because some vehicles will not have any issues that affect the safety of the driver or the passengers. In fact, many vehicles will still be drivable after an accident. Therefore, a salvage title is a warning sign for a potential buyer. However, it is not a guarantee that the vehicle will not function as intended. That is why a buyer needs to perform a thorough inspection on a vehicle with a salvage title.

What is a branded title (what does a branded title mean)?

A branded title is a classification on a vehicle's title that states the vehicle was once declared a total loss or comes with some other major problem. Cars with branded titles have been repaired or rebuilt and sold. A branded title can mean the car was damaged in a flood, its odometer was rolled back, or it was involved in a major accident. Purchasing a car with a branded title entails risks. These risks may include issues with the car's safety, performance, and even its history. However, some cars with branded titles are still great buys. Before you buy a car with a branded title, you should examine the title thoroughly and test the car after you've purchased it.

Rebuilt title vs. salvage title vs. branded title

It's important to understand the difference between a rebuilt title and a salvage title. A rebuilt title means that a mechanic took a damaged title and repaired it. If a mechanic can't repair a title he will have to issue a salvage title. A salvage title means that a car had major damage in a crash. If a car has a salvage title it will have a rebuilt title with a branded title. A branded title means that the car had major damage in a crash, but the mechanic was able to repair it. Salvage titles are less desirable to buyers. If a car has a salvage title the vehicle will lose a lot of its value. In that case, it might not be worth repairing it.

Is a rebuilt title bad?

Although a rebuilt title may seem like a bad deal, you can make a rebuilt title car work for you. To do this, first you need to learn all you can about the car before you buy. You should be able to see it and drive it and check everything that the car and seller say about it. And if it has a rebuilt title, you can read the report written by the insurance company and find out exactly why the car was totaled. This way you can avoid buying a rebuilt title car that will quickly break down and be more than you can handle.

As long as it was repaired and inspected properly by a reputable mechanic, a rebuilt title car is a perfectly good vehicle to consider buying.

Before you consider buying a car with a rebuilt title

If you are looking to purchase a rebuilt car, you should consider several factors beforehand. First, are the quality of the work done on the car. If you are looking to purchase a car that has been rebuilt, you should ask for proof that it has been inspected. You should also ask for a record of the repairs that have been done to the car. This information could save you a lot of headache down the line.

Salvage title cars are not always in bad shape, sometimes they are rebuilt to the manufacturer's specifications. And if you are willing to do some of the maintenance that comes with any used car, you can get a great deal!

People who are looking to sell their used cars or buy cheap cars will often check out rebuilt title car auctions. These auctions are exactly what they sound like, places where cars that have been salvaged after an accident are sold to the public. Of course, not all of these cars are in bad shape. Some of them are practically brand new! Because the sellers want to turn a profit, they can be quite willing to negotiate. You can find some great deals in rebuilt title car auctions.

How to determine the value of the rebuilt title car?

It's important for individuals who are looking to buy a new and used vehicle to know how a rebuilt title affects the value of a vehicle and what the benefits and setbacks are of having a rebuilt title before buying a vehicle.

The Kelley Blue Book will tell you exactly what a car is worth in a number of different conditions. Here's a step by step process on how to use a Kelley Blue Book: First, you need to know the year, make, model, and mileage of the vehicle. Next, find the vehicle in the book. This will tell you how much the vehicle is worth when in perfect condition. After, subtract the amount of miles the car has from the original mileage the car had when it was purchased. You can also compare prices and see what other people are paying for rebuilt titles.

A rebuilt title car value calculator is a great tool for anyone who is in the market for rebuilt title cars for sale. While all cars on the market have a value, not all of these values are created equally. Don't just go on the word of the salesman. Do your due diligence and check the value. The value of a car is calculated by its mileage and the year it was built. A rebuilt title car value calculator can assist you in understanding the value of the automobile. The condition of the engine, its interior and exterior, and its mileage are all used to calculate its market value.

What to look for when you shopping for a car with a rebuilt title

If you want a good deal on a car, a rebuilt title might be a good thing to look for. Here are a few reasons to get a rebuilt title. They're not always a bad thing! They're usually priced at a discount because of some minor damage or some other minor issue, but nothing that affects the driving performance of the car. Sometimes a rebuilt title is a good way to get a high-end luxury car like Bentley, Audi R8 and BMW M4, without paying a high-end luxury car price. In rare cases, a car's title will be rebuilt if it was totaled in an accident. But most of the time, a car's title will be rebuilt if it was in an accident and the owners insurance company paid out for a total loss. If you want a good deal on a car and you don't mind taking a chance on a car with a little bit of a history, you might want to consider a rebuilt title.

There are different kinds of rebuilt car reports that will tell you the history of the car. The VIN report will tell you if the car has been in a major accident and what caused it. The vehicle accident report will tell you if the vehicle has been in a minor accident (or no accident but only salvaged because of theft). If you want to buy a rebuilt title car, you'll need to know all of the information on the different reports and how it will affect your new vehicle.

Some people wonder if they should buy a car that has a rebuilt title. The short answer is that you should always buy a rebuilt title car with many questions. Even if you find a car with a clean title, you'll still want to take a look at the car before you buy. Buying a car with a rebuilt title is much better than buying a car with a clean title and it's a good way to save money. It's important to always ask the seller as many questions as possible before you decide to buy. The best thing you can do is to take a look at the car yourself. The worst thing you can do is to take a look at the car. You should always ask for as much information as possible and do as much research as possible to give yourself an idea of what you're getting.

What is salvage title insurance?

Most people know there are insurance companies for auto accidents, but some are unaware of the salvaged title car insurance. This form of insurance is for people who want to continue using their vehicle after it has an accident or has some other defect that prevents it from being safe to drive. Insurance policies that cover salvaged title cars are for people who want to keep their car instead of trading it in for something newer. These policies are also for people who aren't able to pay the cash value for a new car due to their low income.

Can I get an auto loan for a rebuilt title car?

The best way to see if you qualify for an auto loan with a rebuilt title is to check with several lenders and compare rates and repayment terms. You may want to consider comparing lenders whose business is to do auto loans with rebuilt titles. At the very least, you should be able to find one or two lenders who specialize in auto loans with rebuilt titles. The easiest way to do this is to use Google. Simply type in "auto title loan lenders" and you should find a few companies whose business is to do auto loans with rebuilt titles.

Here are a few tips to help you figure out how to get an auto loan for a rebuilt title. Start off by talking to a few different banks and financial institutions and find out what you can and can't do with a rebuilt title and what the different options are. Determine which route is best for you, but be sure that you get all the information you need before you start down that road.

What is a typical rebuilt title application process?

A salvage vehicle may be re-titled and registered in several ways. The owner should be aware that there are regulations that must be followed. If the car was even partially rebuilt from parts sourced from other salvage cars, such as those purchased from a salvage yard, the owner will have to have an Affidavit of Motor Vehicle Assembled From Wrecked or Salvaged Motor Vehicles filled out and notarized.

The process for replacing a lost title varies depending on the state you live in. In many states, in order to make a replacement title application, you'll need to submit a few pieces of information and provide a small fee. First, you'll need to fill out an application for a replacement title and indicate type of lost title and where you lost it. You'll also need to provide proof of insurance and pay a fee. Then, you'll take this application to your local county clerk and hopefully receive your replacement title.

It's important to fulfill the requirements of a salvaged vehicle before you can apply for a title and registration. Additionally, you will need to inspect the vehicle and restore it to a safe and drivable condition. This will require obtaining parts and repairing and replacing any and all body parts and mechanical systems. There is a specific order that you must follow. First, you'll need to verify the VIN. Then, you'll need to inspect the vehicle and all the parts. After that, you'll need to replace or repair the body and mechanical systems. Finally, you'll need to notify the DMV and fill out the necessary applications for a title and registration.

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Apache Title by Manuel Tuffin